Chicago Professor: “It Should Be Legal To Kill Newborn Babies “


A biologist Prof. Jerry Coyne at one of the most prestigious universities in the country , University of Chicago expressed approval over the idea of killing “newborns who have horrible conditions or deformities, or are doomed to a life that cannot by any reasonable light afford happiness.”

The killing of newborn babies, will someday become “widespread” and “it will be for the better” Professor Jerry Coyne has claimed. In a recent blog post, Dr. Jerry Coyne argued just that, insisting that society will eventually legalize infanticide and that we should probably just get on with it. A professor of ecology and evolution at the University of Chicago, Coyne muses that we should follow the path of the Netherlands, which implemented the 2004 Groningen Protocol in order to lay out the guidelines for dispatching severely disabled newborns. Disability advocates, Coyne notes, have a tendency to squawk about Singer’s unpopular views, but people have overcome their resistance to assisted suicide, so surely society can get used to the idea of infanticide, as well. Coyne literally compares it to putting a household pet to sleep:

It’s time to add to the discussion the euthanasia of newborns, who have no ability or faculties to decide whether to end their lives. Although discussing the topic seems verboten now, I believe some day the practice will be widespread, and it will be for the better. After all, we euthanize our dogs and cats when to prolong their lives would be torture, so why not extend that to humans? Dogs and cats, like newborns, can’t make such a decision, and so their caregivers take the responsibility. (I have done this myself to a pet, as have many of you, and firmly believe it’s the right thing to do. Our pain at making such a decision is lessened knowing that dogs and cats, like newborns, don’t know about death and thus don’t fear it.)

The reason we don’t allow euthanasia of newborns is because humans are seen as special, and I think this comes from religion—in particular, the view that humans, unlike animals, are endowed with a soul. It’s the same mindset that, in many places, won’t allow abortion of fetuses that have severe deformities. When religion vanishes, as it will, so will much of the opposition to both adult and newborn euthanasia.

Reached by email and asked to expand on his newborn-euthanasia position, Coyne told The College Fix: “I”m [sic] writing a longer piece on this that will answer your questions [and] I’d prefer to defer the answers until I write that.”

He added that the reason why the practice is not currently allowed comes from “religion” because “humans are seen as special”.

“It’s the same mindset that, in many places, won’t allow abortion of fetuses that have severe deformities. When religion vanishes, as it will, so will much of the opposition to both adult and newborn euthanasia.”