Desperate Democrats!!! Don’t expect the Electoral College to upend Trump victory


Don’t expect the Electoral College to prevent Donald Trump from becoming our President. Don’t hold out false hope. Don’t keep thinking a petition and a few op-eds are going to bring The Revolution. Yes, it is Constitutionally possible and admissible for the Electoral College to prevent Trump from assuming the presidency, even though he emerged the victor on Election Day.
That scenario certainly could happen. But now the question is: Will it happen?

The call for an Electoral College coup is one of those things — like the word “normalize” and the concept of “fake news” — that many left-leaning opinion-havers seemed to simultaneously discover and disseminate within 48 hours of the election. There is now a petition with nearly five million signatures demanding the College thwart Trump and put Democratic challenger Hillary Clinton in his place.

Meanwhile, a few electors have made headlines by claiming they will refuse to vote for Trump when the time comes on Dec. 19. The latest is Christopher Suprun, a Republican elector in Texas who announced his plan Monday in a now-trending New York Times op-ed.

The College’s 538 electors — comprising locally elected individuals you’ve likely never heard of — meet after every presidential election to cast votes according to electoral score. That means 306 electors will be voting for Trump, and 232 will vote for Hillary Clinton, because that is how America voted.

For an overthrow, Clinton does not necessarily have to “beat” Trump in this vote. The electors, according to the Constitution, would rather have to deny him a majority of 270 votes. That means the first step to stopping Trump from becoming President would be having at least 37 electors flip their votes.

No American election has ever seen more than one elector break the rules. Hypothetically, let’s say at least 7% of the electors decide this time to do the opposite of what they are there to do. The Constitution says that, without a majority, the House of Representatives would choose three candidates based on who received the most Electoral College votes. Those would inevitably be Trump, Clinton and some third contender who may have never even been a nominee (could be Bernie Sanders, could be John Kasich, who knows).

Each state would then cast one vote for those three candidates, with the winner of that vote becoming the President.

The College’s 538 electors — comprising locally elected individuals you’ve likely never heard of — meet after every presidential election to cast votes according to electoral score. That means 306 electors will be voting for Trump, and 232 will vote for Hillary Clinton, because that is how America voted.

For an overthrow, Clinton does not necessarily have to “beat” Trump in this vote. The electors, according to the Constitution, would rather have to deny him a majority of 270 votes. That means the first step to stopping Trump from becoming President would be having at least 37 electors flip their votes.

No American election has ever seen more than one elector break the rules. Hypothetically, let’s say at least 7% of the electors decide this time to do the opposite of what they are there to do.

The Constitution says that, without a majority, the House of Representatives would choose three candidates based on who received the most Electoral College votes. Those would inevitably be Trump, Clinton and some third contender who may have never even been a nominee (could be Bernie Sanders, could be John Kasich, who knows).

Each state would then cast one vote for those three candidates, with the winner of that vote becoming the President.

Still, people going to the typically ho-hum electoral gatherings have been drawn into the rough and tumble of campaign-season politics. Republicans are being beseeched to revolt in a torrent of lobbying, centered on the arguments that Clinton won the popular vote and that Trump is unsuited to the presidency. Most of it is falling on deaf ears, but it has also led to some acquaintances being made across the great political divide.

Soure:  nydailynews.com