US GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN: WHAT’S CLOSED , WHO IS AFFECTED? HERE IS THE LIST


The Senate failed to pass a stopgap government funding bill before the end of Friday, when government funding lapsed until lawmakers reached an agreement and passed a different stopgap measure on Monday. Nearly all Senate Democrats voted against the funding bill Friday, as they were frustrated with progress toward bipartisan legislation to shield hundreds of thousands of young immigrants from deportation.

Many federal agencies close down, so that potentially hundreds of thousands of government employees have to take a leave of absence, often without pay. Services such as national security, electricity generation and air traffic control continue, but others considered non-essential, like visa and passport processing, could be delayed. US Defence Secretary Jim Mattis said that over 50% of his department would not go to work, and some of the military’s maintenance, training and intelligence operations would come to a halt.

How key parts of the federal government would be affected by a shutdown:

INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE

A shutdown plan posted on the Treasury Department’s website shows that nearly 44 percent of the IRS’ 80,565 employees will be exempt from being furloughed during a shutdown. That would mean nearly 45,500 IRS employees will be sent home

HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES DEPARTMENT

Half of the more than 80,000 employees will be sent home. Key programs will continue to function because their funding has ongoing authorization and doesn’t depend on annual approval by Congress.

States will continue to receive payments for the Children’s Health Insurance Program, which covers about 9 million kids. However, long-term funding for the program will run out soon unless Congress acts to renew it.

JUSTICE DEPARTMENT

Many of the nearly 115,000 Justice Department employees have national security and public safety responsibilities that allow them to keep working during a shutdown.

The more than 95,000 employees who are ‘exempted’ include most of the members of the national security division, U.S. attorneys, and most of the FBI, Drug Enforcement Administration, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, U.S. Marshals Service and federal prison employees. Criminal cases will continue, but civil cases will be postponed as long as doing so doesn’t compromise public safety. Most law enforcement training will be canceled, per the department’s contingency plan.

STATE DEPARTMENT

Many State Department operations will continue in a shutdown. Passport and visa processing, which are largely self-funded by consumer fees, will not shut down.Department operations will continue through the weekend and staffers will be instructed to report for work as usual on Monday to find out whether they have been furloughed.

DEFENSE DEPARTMENT

The U.S. military will continue to fight wars and conduct missions around the world, including in Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan. And members of the military will report to work, though they won’t get paid until Congress approves funding.

But Defense Secretary Jim Mattis warned Friday that a shutdown will have far-reaching effects.

‘Our maintenance activities will probably pretty much shut down,’ he said during remarks at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. ‘We do a lot of intelligence operations around the world, and they cost money. Those, obviously, would stop. And I would just tell you that training for almost our entire reserve force will stop.’

US INTELLIGENCE AGENCIES

The workforce at the 17 U.S. intelligence agencies will be pared down significantly, according to a person familiar with contingency procedures.While they can be kept on the job, federal workers can’t be paid for days worked during a shutdown.

HOMELAND SECURITY DEPARTMENT

Immigration and Customs Enforcement will be staffed at about 78 percent, meaning more than 15,000 of the agency’s employees will keep working. The Secret Service, also part of Homeland Security, will retain more than 5,700 employees during the shutdown.

TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT

More than half — 34,600 — of the Department of Transportation’s 55,100 employees will continue working during a shutdown.Controllers and aviation, pipeline and railroad safety inspectors are among those who would continue to work.

But certification of new aircraft will be limited, and processing of airport construction grants, training of new controllers, registration of planes, air traffic control modernization research and development, and issuance of new pilot licenses and medical certificates will stop.

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

NPS closes most national parks during government shutdowns. The agency controls 417 different ‘units’ from American Samoa to Maine. Of these 417 ‘units’, 59 are national parks.